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Article Released Wed-27th-May-2009 17:51 GMT
Contact: Ruth Institution: Nature Publishing Group
 Genetics: Transgenic monkeys with a healthy glow

A transgenic line of monkeys carrying a gene encoding green fluorescent protein fully integrated into their DNA has been created for the first time. The research, published in Nature this week, marks the first such feat in non-human primates and paves the way for developing new models of human diseases.

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VOL.459 NO.7246 DATED 28 MAY 2009

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Genetics: Transgenic monkeys with a healthy glow (pp 523-527; N&V *Press Briefing*)

A transgenic line of monkeys carrying a gene encoding green fluorescent protein fully integrated into their DNA has been created for the first time. The research, published in Nature this week, marks the first such feat in non-human primates and paves the way for developing new models of human diseases.

Scientists reported the first transgenic monkeys last year — a model of Huntington’s disease — but in these animals, the gene did not fully integrate into the monkey’s own DNA and was not passed down to their offspring. In this report, Erika Sasaki and colleagues used viral DNA as a delivery vehicle to introduce the gene for GFP into the DNA of the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus. They show that the gene integrated into the monkey’s DNA and was successfully passed down to their offspring, which were healthy and all expressed the new gene.

Transgenic mice have contributed immensely to biomedical research, but for many diseases they are too dissimilar from humans for the results to be meaningful. Non-human primates hold great promise for the study of several human diseases, particularly neurological disorders, for which there are currently no appropriate experimental models. This study marks an important milestone on the road to developing the means to investigate these diseases.

In an accompanying news story, Nature News reporter David Cyranoski explains why other transgenic monkeys have failed to reproduce so far, and describes the 5-year Japanese project to develop alternative animal models of which Sasaki’s research is a part. Also in this issue, an editorial calls for researchers working on transgenic primates to go much further than they have so far in articulating the ethical aspects both of their research and its potential applications. Engagement in public discussion is essential to avoid inappropriate regulation.

CONTACT
Erika Sasaki (Central Institute for Experimental Animals, Kawasaki, Japan)
Tel: +81 44 7544 480; E-mail: esasaki@ciea.or.jp

Hideyuki Okano (Keio University School of Medicine, Japan) Co-author
Tel: +81 3 5363 3746; E-mail: hidokano@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp

Gerald Schatten (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, USA) N&V author
Tel: +1 412 641 2400; E-mail: gps15@pitt.edu

Shoukhrat Mitalipov (Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, OR, USA) N&V author
Tel: +1 503 614 3709; Email: mitalipo@ohsu.edu

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