Announcement Released Wed-2nd-February-2011 17:00 GMT
Contact: Ruth Institution: Nature Publishing Group
 
Molecular biology: Fat has a new enemy
Science

In Nature China this week - Structural biology: Without a weak spot; Organometallic chemistry: Nature's way; Photochemistry: Long live the excited state; Theoretical chemistry: Flattening silicon; Oncology: Soy joy; Public health: Safe and effective; Vertebrate palaeontology: Cracking the pterosaur mystery.

Nature China highlights the best research coming out of Mainland China and Hong Kong, providing scientists from around the world with a convenient portal into publications drawn from across all scientific disciplines. Each week, our editors select the best published research and provide a summary of the results.

Molecular biology: Fat has a new enemy
Researchers have discovered a compound that restores glucose homeostasis, reduces appetite and decreases body weight in obese mice]

Structural biology: Without a weak spot
Crystal structure analysis shows that the surface protein of the H1N1 influenza virus lacks an open cavity to which drugs can bind

Organometallic chemistry: Nature's way
Iron complexes shed new light on the underlying mechanism of nitrogen fixation

Photochemistry: Long live the excited state
Ruthenium polyimine complexes have a long-lived excited state, making them ideal sensitizers for solar cells

Theoretical chemistry: Flattening silicon
Two-dimensional 'silagraphene' is theoretically predicted to be stable and mouldable into nanotubes and nanoribbons

Oncology: Soy joy
Soybeans and soy products are safe for breast cancer patients, even those receiving hormone therapy

Public health: Safe and effective
A large-scale survey in China shows that the PANFLU.1 vaccine is safe and effective against H1N1 virus infection

Vertebrate palaeontology: Cracking the pterosaur mystery
New fossil evidence shows that the reproductive biology of pterosaurs was more like that of reptiles than birds

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